Five years later, I’m finally getting operated on

Five years ago I had to give up one of my passions which is playing the violin. It was not only because I was moving to the UK, but also because of a chronic injury on my wrist/arm.

Throughout elementary school and gymnasium, those who knew me always associated me with the violin. I even had the nickname “Violin Sam.” I used to say that the violin was like an extension of my arm. It was a part of me.

I was 17 years old when I got my injury, originally diagnosed as a Repetitive Strain Injury. I couldn’t move my hand/arm for a month and was in so much pain. I was devastated. A part of me was gone all of a sudden. Nevertheless I still kept playing as much as I could, at least to finish the concerts as well as I could. On a positive note I was allowed to skip my Physics final exam because I lost the ability to write – and my grade was pretty much set anyway.

I learnt to live with the pain and occasionally visit doctors and physiotherapists. During my entire time in medical school, I have always used a computer to write my exams. I wanted to be a surgeon back in the day, but quickly ruled that out as I can’t do surgery if I get constant pain every time I use my arm. Goodbye surgeon dream, goodbye violin, goodbye writing and drawing. Oh well.

 

me with my violin from the royal college of music in stockholm

This photo was taken on the day I returned my violin to the Royal College of Music in Stockholm in 2011, a few months after my injury. This was one of the last times I played the violin.

Years passed, and during my first clinical placement at Manchester University, I spoke of my problems with one of the doctors who was my supervisor. Intrigued with my story, he suggested for me to revisit my problem and get examined once again. I followed his advice and went to a doctor.

The constant visits to doctors began. During the entire year I was in Preston, I was examined by various orthopaedic surgeons, underwent MRI, X-Ray, Neurophysiological tests you name it. They didn’t even finish examining me within a year. I was told they couldn’t find anything wrong. When I moved back home, I decided not to give up and continued my examinations here in Stockholm.

I was referred to see a hand surgeon who turned out to be an anatomy lecturer at Karolinska. Within the 30min that he met with me, he diagnosed me with an unusual condition called Radial Tunnel Syndrome. I will have a nerve decompression surgery at the end of April/May.

For an entire year in the UK if not longer, I had to undergo so many tests when the diagnosis could’ve been made within a few minutes.

In other words, I could’ve been okay by now.

NHS, after being both a medical student and a patient in your system, I don’t doubt the abilities of your doctors but rather the system itself. I agree with the headlines – NHS, it’s time for a reform.

I can’t wait to return to playing the violin once again! 🙂

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