The Nobel Prize Museum with Nils from Läkarstudent.se

 

Ever since I e-mailed Nils from Läkarstudent.se (Sweden’s largest independent website for previous, current and future medical students) regarding contributing my guide on applying to medical school in the UK to his website, we’ve had small e-mail conversations regarding medicine and other things about life and all. Now that I’m at home in Stockholm for a relatively long period of time ever since leaving for Linköping, I thought it was a good time to meet! Where else better than the Nobel Prize Museum, which celebrates people’s revolutionary ideas through the years?

It is always a treat to meet like-minded medical students: generally interested in a lot of things with a passion for research. I thoroughly enjoyed our earlier discussions about potentially revolutionary ideas, historical fun facts and current events especially regarding the medical educational system. The Nobel Prize Museum could definitely not be any more fitting of a location. Until next time! I wonder where to next, the bar is definitely raised high after today.

Nevertheless, as this post has the Nobel Prize Museum in its title, I should probably write something about the Nobel Prize. My favourite Nobel Prize laureate is Marie Curie and Nils’ Röntgen (the discovery of the X-ray). I think those we chose do say something about us, because in the end you would choose something that resonates with you right? Nils’ one is understandable as he has a great interest in the field of radiology, but for me, I wouldn’t really say that I have a great interest in radioactivity, which is Marie Curie’s most famous discovery.

Marie Curie is definitely my favourite Nobel laureate not because I have a great interest in her work, but rather because I have a great interest in her. Marie Curie was the first woman to win the Nobel Prize, the first and only woman to win twice, the only person to win twice in multiple sciences and was part of a Curie family legacy of five Nobel prizes. She had everything that it takes to become a successful researcher: brains, patience and dedication. Oh, and luck too of course. She is not only a role model for us women, but for everyone wishing to discover something that can really make a difference in the world. It was an honour to work at the Curie Institute in Paris, on Pierre and Marie Curie street, where the laboratory they worked in and made their discoveries was located and stands until today. It was definitely a pleasure to visit their old laboratory during one of my lunch breaks, and attend a lecture in the lecture hall where they used to teach.

My dream is to be like Marie Curie. Find an idea I’m passionate about and believe in, and follow it until the end. Maybe it could make a difference in the world, or perhaps even lead to a Nobel Prize. Who knows, but only time will tell!

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