Baguio for the weekend

Baguio we meet again 👋🏽🙃 #Baguio #datviewdoe

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When I was baby, my family and I lived in the US for a while owing to my mom’s studies. As it is common in the West to have cut down pine trees as Christmas trees, we had that during our time there. We wanted the same when we moved back but as the Philippines is a tropical country, they’re not easy to come by. Except for in Baguio. Therefore during one Christmas, we decided to make the trip to Baguio to get a “real” Christmas tree. So ever since I was a child in the Philippines, I have known Baguio as the “cold” city where Christmas trees grow. Which is basically what it is.

Baguio City is a city created during the American occupation for Americans to stay in to escape the heat of the summer, as it is high up in the mountains and is cooler. You actually see people wear winter clothes there. I visited for the first time after perhaps 20 years last year, and again over the weekend. The “cold” reminded me of home!

 

As Baguio is known for their cool climate, it has also become known as one of the few places in the Philippines where strawberries grow. Therefore, aside from their famous ube jam (ube is a Philippine purple sweet potato) from the Good Shepherd (a convent reknown for making and selling Filipino delicacies including this), strawberry flavoured everything is a delicacy here – I had to try their strawberry taho (a Philippine sweet street food composed of tofu and tapioca pearls in sweet sauce) of course! The streets were filled with small stores selling Baguio delicacies, and I came back with at least a whole bag full – we’ll see how many make it back to Sweden.

After dad’s Rotary Club induction for the club in Baguio (the reason why we went to Baguio in the first place), my little brother and I decided to visit the night market, where they sell secondhand clothes or more excitingly for us, street food. I finally got to taste my favourite kwek kwek (deep fried quail’s eggs in batter) and eat some sweet corn in margarine – yum!

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The beautiful garden at BenCab Museum

The next day, just before leaving to go back to Subic, my family took me to the BenCab museum, home of one of the Philippines’ national artists. I have been to several art museums in the past, but this one was different. Apart from the art exhibited by BenCab himself and other Filipino artists he promotes, there is an amazing garden in the back, which is a part of BenCab’s personal garden (he lives next door). With an amazing and serene location like that, with a view of the mountains of rainforest, it’s not surprising BenCab can be so inspired to create such beautiful art. ❤️

The views in Baguio are really something else 🎍 #bencab #bencabmuseum #rainforest

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The news of Brexit is finally hitting me

Yesterday, my newsfeed was filled with news of my friends’ graduations from St Andrews (it’s graduation week over there), midsummer photos from my friends in Sweden and lastly of course, the EU referendum results. What was supposed to be a happy day, was tainted with sadness with the news of the UK leaving the EU.
 
I must admit however, my initial reaction to the results was a somewhat relief, as it further affirmed my decision of leaving the UK. But with the news following the result like the resignation of David Cameron and the crash of the pound, I cannot help but worry about the unpredictable future of the UK. However now that the results are set, we can only hope that the political leaders will steer this result into a mutual positive outcome for both the UK and the EU.
 
Two years ago, I graduated from the most amazing university in the world: the University of St Andrews, Scotland. St Andrews was a university filled with tradition and world-class teaching, attracting students from all over the world. From my time there, I believed that the UK was a welcoming country of opportunity, which valued ambition and talent. Please, let the future international students like myself and other professionals feel as welcome as I did. Please, don’t change 💔
me on my graduation day with a BSc Medicine (Hons) from the School of medicine in St Andrews Scotland

Me on my graduation day with a BSc Medicine (Hons) from the School of Medicine in St Andrews, Scotland

 

 

UK, you will be missed in the EU

Around this time year, I made the bold decision to leave my future in the UK, after four years of medical school there. While most who didn’t know the real story behind it (that’s a story for another day) told me this was a bad decision, I somehow knew my future was elsewhere. A few months later, my newsfeed was flooded with news of my friends on strike for better conditions for Junior Doctors. Today, the UK has now voted to leave the EU. 

If I had stayed, I would’ve had worse conditions as a newly graduate doctor than if I had worked in Sweden. However after today’s events, I wouldn’t even be able to work as a doctor in Sweden with a British medical degree. 

Earlier this week, I overcame my fear of officially leaving Manchester University (I’m currently on leave) and began the process of withdrawing my enrolment. Sure, I had to undergo a traumatic year to make me finally leave the UK, but somehow I feel that that was the universe/God’s way of directing me to where I’m supposed to go. If I had stayed, what would have I done now? 

To all my friends (especially those from the EU) in the UK, I hope the decision of the UK leaving the EU doesn’t affect your future plans in any way. UK, I wish you all the best in standing on your own two feet. Thank you for giving me a free BSc Medicine (Hons) from St Andrews when I could.

I’m on vacation!

minion vacation by the beach gif

Dear all,

I am now on VACATION! For the next two months, expect many vacation photos and lots of travel stories. My medical posts will be very close to nonexistent until August, and I apologise for this! Nevertheless, I am now about to board my final flight of the day. After a 10h stopover in Hong Kong, I’m about to board my flight to Manila!

For the first time ever, I’ve decided to travel solo around the Philippines, and finally see the sights I’ve grown up hearing about. Considering the amount of travel I’ve done in the past (taught English in Romania, hitchhiked across Europe in a unicorn onesie, been to a total of 46 countries and counting etc…), it’s really a shame that I haven’t seen my own homeland. I’m nearing the end of my medical degree, I’m single and I’m about to turn 23. If I don’t do it now, when would I ever do it? So here’s to my first solo vacation to my homeland the Philippines!

I will be visiting several islands and areas in the Philippines. Despite the monsoon season, I promise pretty photos!

After the Philippines, I’ll be travelling to Iceland with my family, and then finally to World Youth Day in Poland. Watch out for those posts after my solo three-week vacation (#samcation) in the Philippines.

Well, here I go. Wish me luck! Here’s to a well-deserved vacation!!

How about you, what are you up to this summer? 🙂

I don't think I'd ever get tired of this view ❤️#imhome

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Why (original song)

It’s been a while since I wrote a song, blame it on being busy with adjusting to my new life in Linköping (loving it though!). I also haven’t had anything I’ve cared so much about to be inspired to write a so until now. Make it the first that’s not about a boy not anyone I know 😛

In a way, somehow something feels wrong. Today, I’m celebrating my friends’ love for one another during their wedding. In other parts of the world, people die for not being in love with the “right” people. Tomorrow, I’m going to travel across continents for vacation. Others travel across continents fleeing for their lives, only to be told to return on arrival.

As a response to current events such as the Orlando shooting, the sudden rise of xenophobia and the crisis in Syria to name a few, I was finally able to put my thoughts into words through this song. Sometimes we take for granted what we have and forget that we are actually the minority in the world. Others can only dream of having lives like ours. But it shouldn’t be the case. I guess we can only keep dreaming of a better tomorrow, but for it to be a reality, we must begin with ourselves ❤️

Why

Am F C G

Verse 1:
Another headline, another day
Where it says
People dead and numbers rising

When did it become okay
To say
You’re not welcome gates are closing

Pre-chorus 1:
I see the banners hanging high, telling stories that don’t lie
Can’t we see, can’t we see
I hear the people screaming loud, all together in a crowd
They all sing, they all sing

Chorus:
Why can’t we love? 2x
Why can we live? 2x
In peace

Verse 2:
When I look back to this day, would I say
I’m not the reason this is happening
But don’t we have a part to play? A price to pay?
We are happy, they are suffering

Pre-chorus 2:
When did freedom have a price?
When did living not suffice?
To be free, to be free

When did love become a fight?
When did people lose their right?
To love, to love

Chorus 3x

Revision Week vs Tenta-P

I can’t believe it. I just finished my first medical school exams in Sweden. I’M FREE!!! 😀

So I just underwent my first “Tenta-P” (Tenta = exam, P = period) aka revision week followed by exams. I must say, it is very different from my past revision weeks in the UK (at least in St Andrews). Here are a few reasons why.

Revision week – UK; Tenta-P – Sweden

Also, see my previous blog post on Being a medical student in the UK vs Sweden.

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1. Tentagrupp/exam study groups

Revision week: Your exam grade depends on the normal distribution of how the rest of the class does on the same exam. Owing to this competitive nature, preparing for the exams tend to get competitive as well.  You’re on your own, good luck!

Tenta-P: This is probably the best thing about Tenta-P. It’s more social, and you’re not alone. Most join a tentagrupp or an exam study group (including myself) where you meet everyday to go over topics and past exam questions according to your revision week schedule. It’s basically a way to keep yourself (and each other!) motivated and on track, since you know you have to go through the topic before you meet the rest!

community study group group work gif

2. Previous exam questions

Revision week: As previous exam questions tend to get reused, the medical school don’t provide a database with previous exams. Knowing this however, students of previous years collectively made their own “previous exam database.” After one’s exam, one writes all the questions one could remember that came up, to share to the coming students the following year (thug life). This document is constantly growing and is being secretly passed down year after year like an heirloom.

Tenta-P: On our internal school website, we have a database of previous exams (from several years ago up to the one from last semester) available for us to study on, including answers. The questions also have a tendency to be reused, so there were many moments when I was beaming during the exam – that meant I had seen that question before.

simpsons happy paper writing gif

3. I’m still on Facebook

Revision week: Every revision week every semester, I usually deactivate my Facebook to minimise my procrastination and hopefully increase my concentration. My friends were used to this so as revision week approaches, they would normally ask me when I plan to take my Facebook down – and make sure they have my number so I’m reachable.

Tenta-P: I didn’t close down any of my social media accounts, instead I even added another one – Jodel. It proved to be quite a fun method of procrastination.

Be right back Facebook – revision week! One week left until my exam! 😮

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4. More space to study

Revision week: Back in St Andrews, we only had one central university library for all 9000 students. One could say that it definitely was not big enough to fit us all. Especially during revision week. Once, I walked around the library for over an hour trying to find a space with no luck – I just ended up going home. To be fair though, it was also a form of procrastination since you see everyone there during revision week, as everyone take their exams at the same time. Because of this, an early version of Jodel and Tinder combined begun called Spotted at St Andrews Library, where students could post about their library crush anonymously. Procrastination at its best.

Tenta-P: There are several study spaces across campus and I studied in my campus which is part of the university hospital area. To my surprise, I never had a hard time to find a spot to study, and I still seemed to see my fellow medic friends at the medical school. Where do they come from? Where do everyone else study? Wherever they may be, I’m definitely happy they left me a spot to study at the medical school anyway.

5. I’m actually sleeping

Revision week: At first, I would set some alarms at about 6/7am to make sure I wake up and study. After a while, my body gets used to waking up so early, that I don’t need an alarm clock anymore, regardless of the time I go to bed the day before. My body gets used to the 5h a day sleep routine. However, when it’s an extra harsh study day, I can’t afford 5h of sleep. That’s when the caffeine pills come in. Believe it or not, all-nighters with the right company are actually quite fun!

Tenta-P: I never had an alarm during the entire time and I think I got about 7h sleep each night. I never pulled an all-nighter nor took my typical caffeine pills to help me study. I feel so much healthier – and definitely more well-rested.

6. Packed lunches

Revision week: Bringing food to university isn’t really a thing in the UK – well at least in St Andrews as there are no microwaves in campus. So during study breaks from the library, you go to a fast food place and get take out, or to a nice restaurant to eat. Considering one could get a three-course meal from Jahangir (my favourite Indian place ever) for £5 (at the time about 50kr), it wasn’t really a big deal eating out everyday. Which definitely explains why most of us gain weight during revision week. For example, a friend of mine gained over 3kg from eating take out pizza everyday during revision week. But pizza is bae so it’s okay ❤

Tenta-P: To save time, you prepare your packed lunches for the entire week you will be spending in the library during tenta-P, and keep them in the fridge. Then you bring them one by one, and eat with your fellow medic classmates with their packed lunches at the medical school. You end up eating the same thing everyday but who cares, it’s revision week. And definitely more economical (#studentlife). Thank God for microwaves in campus.

7. One doesn’t study in the evening

Revision week: As previously mentioned, late night studying and all-nighters is a thing back in the UK. I used to do at least one all-nighter every revision week and mastered the 5min nap. Literally, I’d put my head down and my friend would time me, but I would automatically get up after 5min anyway and keep going. Also, it’s so much calmer in the evening hence so much easier to concentrate!

Tenta-P: In general, the medical school clears out around 5/6pm during tenta-P. I tend to study more effectively during the evening, so I usually stay on until nearly midnight. Which is apparently unheard of as most during this time are at home relaxing – or better yet sleeping – after the day’s study schedule. I often wished I was them.

sheldon cooper from big bang theory gif all nighter don't need sleep need answers

8. I’m actually doing other things apart from studying

Revision week: Life is wake up, study, eat while studying, sleep (if you can), study. Breaks every now and then if you deserve it. Repeat.

Tenta-P: So my friend Arianne from St Andrews came to visit over the weekend (yes, the few days before the exam), and I also celebrated a friend’s graduation back home in Stockholm. Arianne was a regular revision week study buddy of mine back in St Andrews, and I must say she was quite surprised by how “normal” I was. Not sleep deprived, not talking medical jargon to myself and lastly, not too stressed to not have a good time out!

9. The fear of failing

Revision week: In the UK, passing is not the difficult part and passing is not enough. You need to get a good grade as well because the better you get, the better it will be for you later. Also, your grade once again depends on the normal distribution of your class’ results. The fear was never about passing, so in a way I never had the anxiety of failing. Rather, the fear was getting a bad grade.

Tenta-P: The day before my exam, I had the biggest pre-exam anxiety ever. So bad I even had to go to church to calm myself down – God was the only one who could help me now. As we don’t receive grades but just a pass or fail on our exams, the fear was on passing as there’s nothing else to aim for unlike before. 65% total minimum was the goal, otherwise you gotta come back in August to do the resits!

spongebob rips in half gif

10. Meh, I’ll just do the resits

Revision week: If you fail an exam, you have one chance of redoing it during the summer. No matter how well you do on the resit, the maximum grade you can get is a pass. Also, it will state on your academic transcript upon graduation that you had to do a resit. If you fail the second time however, you need to repeat the year – touch luck! In other words the mentality is: failure is not an option.

Tenta-P: Once I overcame my pre-exam anxiety of failing, I accepted the fact that I know what I know and I can simply only do my best during the exam. I accepted my highly likely fate of returning for a resit in August. I listened to my friends’ advice who have this embedded within them – doing a resit is not the end of the world. At least the information will be fresh in your mind when the next semester starts! Meh if I fail, whatever there’s always next time 🙂

cat rolling psh whateva whatever i'm out gif

Time for summer vacation. Ehh, Linköping see you during resits in August? 😂