Tonsillectomies are not just routine operations anymore

Sorry for the hiatus, but I am finally feeling better now. I have returned to my normal activities-ish. I now only have a plaster over the surgery site and wear a wrist splint every now and then. Thankfully, my recovery was quick! I promise to write about the surgery and put photos ASAP!

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I am currently on my ENT (Ears, Nose and Throat) placement, now on my final week. Last week due to my newly operated arm I missed more than half the week. But I’m bouncing back now!

Yesterday I attended my first ENT operation (tonsillectomy) ever. This is the first time I’ve attended a surgery for almost a year, and almost two weeks after my own surgery. Suddenly, after being newly operated on myself, my attitude towards operations have changed. It really is different when you’ve been on the other side of healthcare.

Despite tonsillectomies being routine, a range of new thoughts popped up in my head that I’ve never thought about before during operations. Thoughts such as:

  • I wonder what the patient is dreaming about right now. Are they dreaming?
  • Would they remember being woken up and leaving the operation room?
  • How would they react now that their tonsils are gone?
  • How long will their pain last?
  • I wonder if they’d be able to go back to work/school with their throat – sooo painful…

I no longer only think about the long term effects of the surgery, but how the patient will feel right after the operation. I was there too. You enter the hospital with full control of your body and feeling okay. Then you go to sleep, and all of a sudden, you wake up and everything has changed.  

After my operation, I was in pain. I was in such excruciating pain in my arm, that I was dependent on strong opioids such as oxycodone and morphine. I remember how debilitating it was, and how one was so helpless and dependent on others. The pain took over one, and all one can do is wait until it passes – or until the opioids knock you out. But then you wake up several times in the night with the pain needing more. Then you take more painkillers and can finally fall asleep again…

When I see a patient get operated now, I can relate. I can relate to their fear, anxiety, and sympathise for the pain they will undergo post-op. I recall how it was for me and realise, even though this is one of the hundreds of routine tonsillectomies done, the bi-product of the operation itself is the same. All patients will experience a change in their daily lives, with its impact highly underestimated in the beginning. That was definitely the case for me anyway. Of course I think like myself too, all patients are willing to undergo it. Patients have so much hope and trust in the treatment, that its bi-products is long overweighed by its benefits.

After being a patient myself, I understand now why patients feel the way that they do before an operation – even one as common as a tonsillectomy. One is scared for the drastic change that is about to happen – both the good and the bad. One is scared because there is nothing one can do but accept the change, and be patient.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BFEPgcpoN6s/?taken-by=fileea

Post-op hiatus 

Hi all, I’m so sorry for not writing for a while but I want you all to know that the operation went well and I’m recovering well! 🙂 So much has been going on on top of my recovery that I haven’t had the time to write… I’m so sorry! But I promise I will write about my operation and what’s been going on soon 🙂

Until then, here’s a video of me singing Lucky by Jason Mraz with my two little sisters here in Linköping. One week after my operation. You only need a thumb to play the ukulele! 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BFCqvxUoN4z/

I’m about to get operated.

I know I’m in my fifth year of medical school, I know I’ve grown up hearing about operations, I know I’ve seen countless surgeries… But somehow I’m still somewhat scared. Even though this is a quick and non-invasive surgery. 

It’s definitely a completely different experience being the person on the other side of the bed now. Now I understand what patients feel when they come to the hospital. Now I’m one of them lying here waiting for my turn to get operated on.

In a few hours my five years of pain in my right arm will be over. Soon, I can play the violin again! 

Wish me luck and prayers are warmly appreciated! Time for me to become the patient! 😊

https://www.instagram.com/p/BEvA76lIN3l/