5 uniquely British medical practices

I’ll be blunt and admit that I don’t really have a lot of exciting things to tell from the hospital after my placements. I think my placement in medical emergency is a tough one to beat. However recently, I’ve been remembering all these medical practices that was everyday for me in the UK, which now actually seems completely alien to me. I’m converting. There’s a lot that comes to mind, but for starters, here’s a list of five uniquely British medical practices.

1. Clinical wear is basically formal wear

For doctors, clinical wear entails shirt/trousers (NOT JEANS) for men and shirt/blouse/skirt/trousers (again NOT JEANS) for women. Nice flat dress shoes for both genders. Yes, this practice is extremely questionable hygiene-wise, as you come to work with the same clothes you will be wearing the whole day at the hospital, but there is some reasoning behind this.

The medical practice in the UK wanted to take a step away from the hierarchical system by abolishing the white coat and scrubs for doctors. There shouldn’t be anything to distinguish a doctor from a patient appearance-wise, as in the end they’re both people. This is so that there will be no “us and them” mentality between the doctors and the patients, and hopefully, doctors become more approachable during patient contact. It’s a nice thought I guess, and perhaps the prevalence of “white coat syndrome” has diminished over the years. However hygiene-wise once again, questionable.

homer gif giphy saying why so formal lenny you're my go to guy

2. Only black or white shoes are allowed to be worn in the hospital

The professional clinical look in British standards is to be somewhat uniform. Black or white shoes are to be worn as they are more professional. No bright colourful sneakers were allowed. However, I was always jealous of my sister and the bright colourful sneakers she wore around the hospitals in Sweden. So I never listened and decided to rebel and wear my bright orange sneakers. Did I get looks? Yes. Did I get scolded? Sometimes. But boy did I get compliments from patients – “I like your bright orange sneakers, you’re hard to miss in this hospital!” At least I was remembered for my fashion sense.

3. Some doctors wear bow ties or tucked-in ties

As an attempt to improve hospital hygiene, it was implemented that anything hanging around one’s neck is not allowed to be worn in the hospital. Including neck ties. This angered many doctors, as they viewed it to be a crucial part of their professional clinical wear. Therefore they came up with a compromise. Some switched to wearing bow ties, whereas others decided to keep wearing neck ties but started tucking the end of their neck ties inside their shirt. Works I guess.

bow tie from sing movie

4. British hospitals only use black pens

If you look around a British hospital, you will only find black pens and no other colour. I recall being scolded when in the hospital once for taking notes with a blue pen. They told me – how would colour blind people be able to read what I’m writing? I assured them that the notes were only for me to see, and afterwards I had to promise to never use my blue pen again. Since that day, I only brought black pens to the hospital. Yes, it is a rule in British hospitals that you are only allowed to use black pens so that everyone can read what you write, including those who are colour blind.

blue colour blind pen screaming gif giphy

5. You address surgeons as Mr/Mrs/Ms and DEFINITELY not Dr.

“Dr. McCloy… Oh sorry, I mean Mr. McCloy!”

I bet it’s probably only in the UK where some doctors would take offense if you call them Dr. Why you might wonder, which is a pretty good question. As told perfectly in this article, during the origins of surgery around the 18th century, surgeons back then did not possess any formal qualifications let alone a medical degree to be able to hold the title Dr. They were sometimes compared to butchers, and doctors were definitely more superior. However as times have changed, the status of surgeons have risen and thus have become so proud to distinguish themselves from doctors. Today in British hospitals, being called Mr or Mrs/Ms is a badge of honour and could only mean one thing – and that is that you’re a surgeon.
they call me mr tibbs gif giphy

Life lessons from a patient who survived 

(Disclaimer: I received verbal consent from my patient to share about my experience with him.)

Last week, I wrote about a patient of mine who almost died… twice. And I was there with him. I have been visiting him regularly and I am happy to announce that he is now stable. After a month of not seeing his wife, he is now at home with her. 🙂

The weekend before his final operation, I visited him the Friday before I went off to Stockholm. I told him I was going home to sing. He told me that he wishes he could hear me sing sometime. He told me he enjoyed jazz, and so I decided to learn “Fly me to the moon” by Frank Sinatra to perform it the same evening. I showed him the video the coming Monday and was happy to see him smile, laugh and slightly calmer before his upcoming operation. However as he was still nervous, I decided to follow and observe his operation, so I could be there with him as he lay there during his awake surgery. He was grateful.

 

Right before he went home, I visited him for one final time. As usual, laughter and words of wisdom were exchanged. Before saying goodbye, he asked for my name on a piece of paper so he would remember me. I wrote my name down and handed it to him as I told him his full name. I will never forget you either I said.

So to remember him not as a patient but as a person, here are a few wise words from him that I know I will bring along with me throughout the rest of my life. Things I learnt that is not because he was a patient, but because he’s a person caring for another. Note, most advice were aimed at my lovelife…

1.

Gör nÄgot som du brinner för. Om du inte brinner för det, sluta. Annars kommer du inte göra bra ifrÄn dig.

“Do something you’re passionate about. If you’re not passionate about something, stop. Otherwise, you won’t excel.”

2.

NÀr du trÀffar nÄgon ska det gÄ lÄngsamt, sÄ att du hinner se bÄde fördelarna och nackdelarna av en person och kan göra ett bra beslut

“When you meet someone, take it slowly so you have time to see both the pros and cons of the person to make a good decision”

3.

NÀr du Àr i ett förhÄllande Àr det DU som ska bestÀmma, sÄ att allt gÄr som du vill att det ska gÄ och du blir glad

“When you are in a relationship, it is YOU who should decide, so that everything will be how you want it to be and you will be happy”

4.

Gör alltid tid Ät din familj, i slutÀndan Àr det de som alltid kommer finnas dÀr för en

“Always make time for your family, because in the end they will be the ones who will always be there for you”

5. And last but not least my absolute favourite… (I hope you guys understand I’m always laughing each time he gives me advice on my lovelife)

Om han inte kommer eller gör nÄgonting för din skull sÄ Àr han inget att ha

“If he doesn’t attend or do anything for you then he’s no one for you to have”

Oh dear patient of mine, I hope you are enjoying your time drinking red wine with your wife at home. I will never forget you!

In the end though, what did I really learn? Medicine goes a long way, but empathy goes even further.

 

What do you tell someone who’s about to die?

(Disclaimer: I received verbal consent from my patient to share about my experience with him.)

This week I’ve been at the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, and nothing has challenged me more physically, mentally and emotionally during a placement.

At the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, many patients come in after suffering heart attacks. They are in critical need of care, where many patients are vulnerable and are fighting to stay alive… and the healthcare team fighting to keep them alive.

The week began quite calmly, which gave me lots of reading time, but since yesterday and especially today, I’ve been running.

Running. Trying to learn and help out during critical situations, but mainly trying to keep out of the way. Running to wherever the alarm rings. Another patient is dying. Every second counts.

Yesterday, in the midst of a flurry of doctors and nurses trying to save another patient from a cardiac arrest, everyone leaves the room to discuss. At this point, several life-saving electric shocks had been given, and I was there to witness them all. Even seeing the patient in pain.

I tried fighting my tears as I realise, I don’t like seeing patients in pain. And I really wish I don’t ever have to. But there I was.

I was left alone in the room with the patient and I take their hand to comfort them. The patient then looks at me straight in the eyes and tells me:

Jag kommer nu.” – “I’m coming now.”

Coming. Coming to a place beyond us. Coming to death. Coming to what I like to believe, life after death. Coming to Heaven.

I was silent, again fighting my tears. I look straight back not knowing what to say. What do you tell someone who knows they’re about to die, and you know it too? What do you tell someone who’s about to die?

*

This question wracked my brain until the next day. Could I have said anything to improve the situation? What if that really was the last chance I got to talk to them? What if I was the last person they spoke to, and I couldn’t even say a word?

Fortunately, this story has a happy ending. After a rough night and morning of more emergency interventions, the patient is alive and recovering. I finished my day early and decided to pass by the patient’s room to talk to them. It didn’t really feel right for me to leave for the weekend, not knowing whether they will be okay or not when I return. I waited for their room to be free, came in, and in the end I stayed for over an hour chatting. At the end of it they took my hand and told me:

“You have an important duty to pass on your genes to the next generation and I hope you have many children… but be careful with your choice!”

I promised I will, and in return I made them promise they will be around when I come back after the weekend.

As a medical student, I usually joke that another day at the hospital is another life saved, but now I realised this is not a joke at all. As healthcare workers, we are given the unique opportunity to make great changes in people’s lives, and sometimes even save a life. However at times, we are also there as they take their last breath. Being prepared for both scenarios would make the best impact on people’s lives and today, I realised I still have a lot left to learn.

heart ECG tracing recording

 

How I developed radial tunnel and lost the ability to play the violin

Five years ago, possibly owing to my Type A personality and absurdly high expectations on myself, I lost one of my biggest passions at the time, which was the violin.

Starting at the age of 16, I decided to pick up the violin again after a hiatus of three years. I auditioned and started taking lessons and playing in an orchestra at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm. I quickly picked it up again, and starting from playing in the furthermost row in Violin 2 in my orchestra, the following year I was playing in the front row beside the Concerto Maestro in Violin 1. The College also allowed me into their violin vault filled with priceless violins to pick one for myself. After going through several priceless violins, I picked a Danish violin from the beginning of the 1800s. That moment I chose my violin is a very special memory for me, which I can most closely describe as like when Harry Potter chose his wand from Ollivander’s Wand Shop.

Harry Potter chose his wand at the Ollivander wand shop

My teachers at school found out I play the violin, and so apart from the pieces I played at the College, one could see me with my violin at assemblies as well. For all these pieces I was expected to play, I practiced at least 4h a day, especially during concert season nearing the summer. People had very high expectations on me, and my expectations on myself even higher. I had my violin with me everywhere, we were inseparable.

Nearing the end of concert season right before the summer of 2011, I suddenly would start getting severe shooting pain and numbness/tingly feelings in my fingers in my right hand/arm. My doctor told me I needed to rest and was referred to a physiotherapist. But no. I was going to finish concert season.

I would hide my wrist splint prescribed to me by the physiotherapists every time I came to the College, so my teachers won’t know I’m actually not allowed to play. Eventually my arm got the best to me near the end of concert season, to the point I couldn’t move it for an entire month. I skipped exams as I couldn’t write anymore (I’m right handed and that was where I got injured), attended my medical school interviews wearing a wrist splint etc. It was very hard on me physically, but even harder on me emotionally. But somehow through it all, I managed all my concerts.

At the end of concert season, I told myself I need to rest my arm. I rested it until I moved to university in St Andrews. I started playing a little for myself there, but I still kept getting pain. Now the pain was persistent every time I used my arm. I lost the ability to play the violin.

The following years, I sought healthcare back and forth in the UK with no result. I started getting physiotherapy including ultrasound (or what my teacher calls whale song therapy) and was prescribed NSAID anti-inflammatories. I started getting tested in various ways such as X-ray, MRI, electrophysiological tests you name it. I was given different diagnoses all the time and met various doctors constantly. Carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, repetitive strain injury, tendonitis
 but none of them were correct until I came back to Sweden after four years in the UK.

I was referred to see a hand surgeon who happens to be a lecturer at Karolinska (my friends remember him and said that when they came out of his lecture everyone wanted to be hand surgeons!) and within 30min of hearing my story and examining me, he decided that I was to be operated. I was finally diagnosed with the correct diagnosis – radial tunnel.

It has gone three weeks since my operation and right now I’m on my way to Stockholm to see my hand surgeon for the first time since. We’re finally removing the steri-strips (the protective layer applied on the surgical site during the operation) and I’ll be seeing my surgical scar for the first time. Or my battle wound as I’d like to call it. My violin battle wound.

Soon I can play the violin again. Soon I can return to one of my passions. Soon. ❀

girl with violin from the Royal College of Music in Stockholm

This is a photo of me and my precious violin from the Royal College of Music in Stockholm five years ago when my problems started. This was the last time I could properly play the violin. My violin was repaired in 1862 by a Danish instrument maker named G. Enger in Copenhagen.

Dermatology: expectation vs reality

I’m going to admit, dermatology wasn’t one of the placements I was looking forward to. I’m sure I wasn’t alone in this either. Luckily, after two weeks at dermatology, one can say I was very much positively surprised!

Here are some of my expectations from before the placement and my insights of the specialty after my two-week placement.

1. You see acne and eczema everyday

arnold schwarzenegger it's not a toomah gif

On the contrary, most of the times it was a toomah.

During our two weeks there, I saw two acne patients and probably around five eczema patients. Skin cancer patients on the other hand? I definitely lost track. They came by the truckloads. Perhaps the reason why I thought dermatology = eczema and acne is because those are the only two skin problems I ever sought medical help for. Also, I’m brown. So what skin cancer?

2. Apart from acne and eczema, it’s all about too much sun

ross from friends back with a failed tan gif

So many patients come in with different skin lesions, many explained by too much sun exposure. However, when I was studying about the different diseases we saw at the hospital, I was surprised that it is so much more than that. This really became apparent for me when I was reading about psoriasis. I mean in this case, it is even the opposite.

Psoriasis is a skin condition which has a complex immunological pathogenesis – a lot more than just simple skin damage. It has been shown that sunlight has a therapeutic effect, improving the patients’ disease. Consequently, psoriasis patients in Sweden actually get offered a free three-week “therapeutic” vacation in the south of Europe. Not bad eh?

This is just one of the many skin conditions that is not because of sun damage.

3. There is a cream for everything

shaq holding a lotion bottle gif

Rash? Take this cream. Acne? Take this cream. Palmoplantar pustulosis? Take this cream.

Although there is some truth in this (yes, the main treatments for those conditions I mentioned are creams), it’s only a very, very small part of what dermatologists do to treat patients. Dermatologists also prescribe other forms of medication like injections and tablets, and also perform surgery of course – via liquid nitrogen “freezing” or excision! They also treat their patients in different baths and therapeutic light therapy, which is basically therapeutic solariums. Also, did you know that dermatologists in Sweden are  venerologists (STD-specialists) too? Yup, if there’s some funny business going on down below, you go to a skin doctor.

4. Most dermatologists are women

beyonce who run the world girls

When we came to the clinic during our first day, I was positively surprised that our supervisor was a very friendly and jolly male överlĂ€kare or consultant. There were actually a lot more male dermatologists than I thought, because he wasn’t the only one I met at the three hospitals I visited. At our main hospital there were at least three!

5. Most patients are vain

cat looking at the mirror saying I am beautiful gif

My thinking before the placement: “Patients who come to dermatology are vain which is why they’re super self-conscious about their skin.” Boy was I wrong.

In cases of acne and eczema, I thought patients come in because they want to make themselves even prettier by treating the disease. I realised that they come in because they want to be pretty. Because they don’t think they are.

There is apparently a link between acne and negative mental well-being, and this I could definitely see from some of the patients I met. Many develop low self-esteem and even a form of dysmorphism, because of their skin problems. Definitely the opposite to what I thought in the beginning.

6. Dermatology is a “clean” specialty

a pig taking a bath being clean gif

What I mean by clean is that there is no need for messy tubes here and there, sputum/faeces/sweat etc. samplings, no need to open patients up etc. The speciality relies mainly on the visual evaluation of a person’s condition. See, clean. Although it might be so most of the time, there are definitely exceptions.

During our first visit to the dermatology ward, we visited a patient with a rare but severe cutaneous vasculitis called pyoderma gangrenosum. If you’re curious, do google it, but be wary of what you will see. I warned you. Keep in mind though, the photos you will find on google are very, very far from what I saw. The patient we saw basically had no flesh all the way down to his tendons, on both feet extending above his ankle. Exactly like how you would see a fixed cadaver model of feet muscles for anatomy. But this time the specimen is alive. That is not what I would”clean” at all, and I don’t even want to start about the smell…

7. Skin lesions will no longer be dots for me after two weeks

Jokes nope, still dots.

elmo shrugging gif

Dermatologists for the day

It’s coming to the end of our dermatology placement here in Jönköping and apparently as always, during this week they give us the opportunity to have our own clinic. It may just be me but I was slightly worried, but excited to have our own patients. I remember enjoying this when I got the opportunity in the UK. But this time it’s dermatology though. Do I know enough about skin?

My first patient came in and luckily he was a jolly man coming to check on a skin lesion on his head. After a few minutes of conversation, our doctor supervisor knocks on the door to take me out of the room for discussion together with my classmate, who also had his own patient. After the discussion, we decided to see my classmate’s patient first and then mine. However when we went to my patient, he was gone!

Great, my first own patient ever in Sweden vanished into thin air. Well that wasn’t a very good start now was it. (We called him later on and found out he didn’t leave because he was unhappy with the care but because he had an appointment to keep.)

Nevertheless, I had to put my worries aside and take my next patient in.

I let in my next patient who was a woman around my age with acne problems. I don’t know if it was because we were of similar age or that I also have had acne problems in the past, but we got along really well! She was telling me of the negative impact her acne has had on her mental well-being, and I definitely could relate. So I decided to give her the same self-care advice I was given which helped me with my acne – “off the record” of course. I told her I will now step out of my “doctor” role and now into my role as a girl helping another girl out.

Unfortunately, as I was giving her my acne care and makeup tips, the doctor came in to bring me out for discussion. Darn, I was in the middle of something I thought.

After discussing my classmate’s and my patients, we decided to see my classmate’s patient before mine once again, mainly because I asked for some time to speak with my patient some more afterwards. Then we came to see my patient.

We discussed at length with my patient regarding the etiology of acne and its treatment, which she greatly appreciated. We also discussed the negative impacts it has for my patient. At the end of the consultation we came to a treatment plan that both she and we were happy with. After this she said:

“At first annoyed that I had to come to the doctors this morning because it’s my birthday today. But now I feel that I’m getting something from you so I’m happy I came. It’s like a present for me, so thank you!”

Touched, we all said goodbye to her. As I said goodbye however I asked if she had more questions for me. She then asked me for more acne care and makeup tips, and I was happy that I could continue where I left off!

I told her the importance of moisturising (which I learnt from my sister), and informed her of the type of make up she should use and not use. I also quickly told her how I usually do my makeup to hide all the spots (perhaps a video tutorial in the future?). She was happy to hear my tips and told me she will buy the products I recommended. I was happy I could talk makeup in a medical setting. Afterwards, we happily said goodbye, and wished each other all the best. I greeted her happy birthday once again, and apologised that I missed that it was her birthday today from the medical journals.

Shame, shame, shame on me. But at least this time, this patient didn’t disappear!

As a doctor, my goal is for my patients to leave the clinic the same way that my second patient left – happy, and with the feeling that we did something that helped them. Even if it is on a day like their birthday. Who knew being a “beauty expert” was part of the job!

image

 

My utomlĂ€nsplacering turned me into a local jetsetter

This week I started my first “utomlĂ€nsplacering” which means a placement outside the county of my medical school. I’m currently placed on a two-week dermatology placement in Jönköping, SmĂ„land.

My friends also placed in Jönköping and I left Sunday evening and arrived at our apartments in the hospital grounds, provided by the hospital. We took our keys from the emergency room (“What was the first think you did in Jönköping? Go to the emergency room of course, ha!” -.-) and went to our temporary accommodation for the next two weeks.

IMG_1770

This is the beginning of the Jönköping hospital grounds, isn’t our apartment building beautiful?

I was worried about how the accommodation would be recalling the nightmare of accommodation we received back in the UK (see photo below), but one can say that I was positively surprised to say the least. THE ACCOMMODATION IS AMAZING!

bathroom at medical student accommodation blackburn hospital preston manchester

This is the accommodation bathroom provided for Manchester medical students based at Blackburn hospital… our accommodation now is definitely a step up #nightmare

Apart from the beautiful exterior, our apartments were MASSIVE! Two separate bedrooms for my roomie and I (it’s probably the biggest room I’ve ever lived in that’s not a hotel), a big hallway, a fully equipped kitchen etc. Free wi-fi, clean linen, pillows and towels to take downstairs, access to the free laundry room, a little library and a TV. At least they definitely thought about our comfort as “travellers.” To make things even better, there’s a full shopping centre right across the road from where we live in the hospital grounds.

*

I’ve been to Jönköping once before with my choir but I don’t remember much from the city. Therefore, being a true traveller, I was quite excited to explore this new place.

We came to our first day yesterday at the clinic and was warmly met by the staff. We have never been so warmly met before! We received our little introduction booklets, keys and decided our schedule amongst us. We found out that it is obligatory for us to travel to different cities as a part of our placement, and I was the “unfortunate” one who gets to travel to two different cities two days in a row.

welcome note for us medical students at jönköping ryhov hospital!

Look they even made us a little welcome note posted on the board!

So this morning as I’m writing this, I’m sitting on the train which will take me to VĂ€rnamo where I will be during the day. The travel there takes 2h, which is basically the same time it took me to go to Jönköping from my medical school Linköping. And it costs 80kr each way (about 8 euros each way – my student wallet is crying). Tomorrow, I will be going to NĂ€ssjö, which will luckily take less than 2h to travel to.

Four cities (Linköping, Jönköping, VÀrnamo, NÀssjö) in four consecutive days. I never realised that going to medical school would mean this much travel. I guess we just need to get used to it since in the end, we need to go to where our patients are. And not everyone will be lucky to have all their patients at the same place as oneself. Luckily, I enjoy being a jetsetter anyway.

I really need a driver’s license.

If I didn’t choose Oncology I would’ve probably chosen Infectious Diseases

During the first week of my Infectious Diseases placement, I recall attending a teaching session by one of the specialists. With much enthusiasm she said: “All diseases start with an infection!” I pondered about that statement for a while and realised that maybe she has a point.

In cases like rheumatic fever leading to heart problems etc later on in life, or H pylori infections leading to gastric ulcers that could eventually lead to cancer, maybe there is truth to her statement.

Infections occur in all systems, and has a multiple-system effect. They don’t always present themselves in the same pattern either. By giving the right antibiotic/antiviral etc among the masses available, you can save a life. Pretty exciting indeed.

During my placement, I met several patients who were in severe sepsis (basically dying) one day, seemed unaffected the next. Magic. One patient around my age came in and was barely able to open his eyes and breathe (he was breathing about >30 breaths per minute). He was losing his breath whilst talking to me. We administered antibiotics and when I visited him the next day, he was back to normal. Magic.

Perhaps my mom had a point when she was encouraging me to pursue Infectious Diseases as a specialty. She has always spoken highly of the specialty, ever since she worked very closely with them as a clinical epidemiologist. I recall the days when mom would travel to Vietnam with the WHO to help eradicate malaria. Perhaps it is due to my early exposure to the specialty that I took a natural interest to infectious diseases. Or perhaps it’s actually in the blood.

Nevertheless, after these two weeks at the Infectious Diseases department, my commitment to oncology is still as strong as it has always been. But my respect and interest for the specialty has definitely grown.

I maybe won’t become an Infectious Diseases specialist in the future, but if there’s someone I would entrust to save the lives of the masses, I would definitely turn to an Infectious Diseases specialist to save the world.happy dancing cats

“Vad bra svenska du talar!”

“Vad bra svenska du talar, verkligen!”

Translation: “You speak really good Swedish, really!”

Ever since coming here to Linköping to continue my studies, I seem to get this quite a lot. Once I tell them about my background of course.

After I tell people about moving to Sweden as a 7-year-old from the Philippines and being in medical school for four years in the UK, somehow, people seem to only focus on that. I chose to study in the UK, because I have studied in English ever since moving to Sweden – international schools from elementary to university. However, I did grow up in Sweden in the end. Somehow, the fact that I’ve been raised in Sweden is overshadowed by my immigrant background and international education.

Should I take this as a compliment? That I learnt how to speak good Swedish after living in Sweden for over 10 years? And didn’t forget it whilst abroad?

Or should I feel offended that because I look and am from a different country, I was expected to speak Swedish badly?

Nevertheless, I must understand, I’m a minority. Not everyone have met us modern Swedes with international backgrounds. In that case, I can be an ambassador to show that assimilation into Swedish culture from another background is possible. Maybe next time they meet someone like me, they won’t be as surprised.

My patient hugged me goodbye :)

For the past two weeks, I have been placed in Infection, and this final week I have been placed in the wards. But I’ll write more about this Infection placement some other time.
During the entire week, I have been in charge of a patient ever since he came into the ward. I was there when he came in, and watched him improve with the antibiotics as the days went by. I was sent in to take a quick history with him alone, and I even met his wife in the corridor. She was looking for him, and luckily I knew where he was.
Today, his infection had improved so much, that he was ready to go home.
I typed out his discharge notes, and came to him with the doctor in charge. Since he was my patient, I was going to discharge him. I gave him my papers, explained what we had done and asked him if he had any questions. At the end of the consultation, I stretched out my hand to say goodbye and to wish him well.
He took my hand and shook it, but then afterwards, he pulled me in for a big hug, thanking us for taking good care of him during his stay.
“I have felt very well taken care of during my entire stay here! At first I was quite angry about it, but you all have been so nice towards me. Thank you very much!”

It is not always you actually manage to reach out to a patient, and for them to understand that you want what is best for them. But when you do reach out to them, the feeling of knowing that something you have done has helped someone else feel better, and for that person to actually appreciate it, is priceless.

giphy